Book Illustration

     A good illustration is more than window dressing to the story.  It’s more than visual interpretation. Illustration is one type of narrative component—the text another. They must weigh equally, work together, combine, to create a singular telling of the story.  To do this the illustrator distills the narrative text, finds the touchstones, those points of commonality.  From there, she seeks the dynamic imagery needed to mirror the character of the writing. If the text is poetic or whimsical or grittily realistic, the illustrations follow suit.

    These illustrations are selected from the book Under One Crown.   (Authors Rachel Jurovics, Sarah Stein, Mary Blocher.)   A description of the book follows the illustrations. 

Under One Crown

(Excerpts from the authors’ description)
Under One Crown looks anew…at a verse in Genesis 1 whose interpretation in Talmud has served as the basis for Judaism’s depiction of the feminine archetype as a source of evil.…A powerful strand in Jewish mystical tradition understands the evil we experience as a consequence of what transpires in that white space.  Indeed, according to this influential interpretive motif, God’s design for the universe requires the Moon’s diminishment in order to account for evil and suffering.…Under One Crown’s alternative to the [Talmudic] narrative yields a more integrated perspective of the masculine and feminine archetypes.